Skip to content
November 25, 2014 / blissmarket

Whispers from The Mountain and The Sea (Documentation)

RIKUZENTAKATA ARTIST –IN-RESIDENCE PROGRAM 2013

JAIME JESUS COMENDADOR PACENA II / PHILIPPINES

Whispers from the Mountain and the Sea:

From the initial research last November and December 2013, upon talking to several local residents,

the story of an invisible division among the city was told, that the city of Rikuzentakata has two parts,

the people living on the mountain side and the people living on the sea side, both parts that composes

a community that celebrate life together before the tsunami incident and hopes to renew that bond

once again.

The concept of whisper is based on the idea on how Japanese people tend to silently move on, quietly

screaming their pain of memories and going through day by day with struggles on resources and definite

future as most of the people lives temporarily in the present, temporary homes, temporary communal

spaces, temporary structures, temporary meetings and engagements.

When we whisper, we silently say something important, something we don’t want everyone to hear,

but hoping everyone would understand. A whisper is a gentle approach in making a statement. A whisper

on this case is a floating memory.

To reimagine the space, part of my process is to look at the city in different physical perspectives,

going to the highest point (Hikami Mountain) and from the perspective of the sea (Hirota Bay), looking

at the city as the waves of sea approach the land. Another part of the process is to catch the sunrise

as it wakes up the city in the Hakone Mountain View Point. These perspectives in looking at the city

helps me internalize more the stories told to me by the local residents, to imagine the place before

and to realize what has happened and what was left.

POSTCARD PROJECT:

Gathered still images of the research process, details of the hiking experience, the sailing experience and

documentation of the reconstruction of the city. The Images focused on the textures, traces, details,

not showing any people.

Chosen images were then transformed into postcards.

The idea of the postcard is also based on my observation in Japan having a “postcard culture,” just like the

business card culture. Postcards are part of sharing a certain place, an event, exhibition, a company

or a personality. Postcards are used by people to send personal messages, intimate messages that are

connected to the experience or memory of the sender to the image on the postcard.

The printed postcards are then shared to the local residents as I gathered personal messages for the

city of Rikuzentakata. A message for the city that was washed away, to the people that was lost

and to the spirit that lives on today. With this process, the local residents and other visitors of the city

who participated silently engages with the city, looking at the details of the images on the postcard

and trying to relive or reimagine what it is and where it is. Upon writing the message, they revisit

the past and share their thoughts for the future, the written messages are then read by the next

participants and this process connects them to each other as they read the messages for them

by other people. This makes the postcards as vessels of communication among the people and the city.

After gathering all the messages it is then offered/sent to the sea and the mountain.

The whole process started January and ended February of 2014.

AIR_RT_PostcardProject (1 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (2 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (3 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (4 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (5 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (6 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (7 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (8 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (9 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (10 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (11 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (12 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (13 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (14 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (15 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (16 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (17 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (18 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (19 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (20 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (21 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (22 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (23 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (24 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (25 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (26 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (27 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (28 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (29 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (30 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (31 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (32 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (33 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (34 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (35 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (36 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (37 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (38 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (39 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (40 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (41 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (42 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (43 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (44 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (45 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (46 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (47 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (48 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (49 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (50 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (51 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (52 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (53 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (54 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (55 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (56 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (57 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (58 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (59 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (60 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (61 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (62 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (63 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (64 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (65 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (66 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (67 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (68 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (69 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (70 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (71 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (72 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (73 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (74 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (75 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (76 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (77 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (78 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (79 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (80 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (81 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (82 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (83 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (84 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (85 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (86 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (87 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (88 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (89 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (90 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (91 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (92 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (93 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (94 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (95 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (96 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (97 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (98 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (99 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (100 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (101 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (102 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (103 of 105) AIR_RT_PostcardProject (104 of 105)

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: